Feasibility and Acceptance of a Novel Nutrition and Exercise Intervention to Manage Excess Gestational Weight Gain: Focus group study in Ontario, Canada.

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In preparation for designing a randomized clinical trial aimed to manage gestational weight gain during pregnancy, we conducted a qualitative study using focus groups of women and health care providers for the purpose of identifying the enablers or barriers that support or limit nutrition and exercise modifications for women during pregnancy and to determine the feasibility of such a program in the community. A purposeful sample of pregnant or recently pregnant (within the last year) women (n=21) and health care providers (n=7) were recruited from community health clinics in Hamilton, Canada. A semi-structured focus group guide was tailored to each target group. Qualitative analysis was completed using NVivo 9 software and key conceptual categories of behavioural, control and normative beliefs were identified from transcribed interview texts and field notes. The results indicated that to make nutrition and exercise interventions more accessible to women of various backgrounds, key facilitators should include: behavioural beliefs of the importance of nutrition and exercise in pregnancy, family support and nutritional education. Identified barriers included: communication with healthcare providers, inter-professional collaboration, language, and lack of specific instructions in currently available guidelines. Collectively, information from women and health providers enabled a clear understanding of barriers, enablers and opportunities for the successful implementation of the planned nutrition and exercise intervention for gestational weight gain management. The identified factors were used to design a clinical randomized trial of a structured and monitored nutrition and exercise program for women beginning in early pregnancy.
Title of abstract: 
Feasibility and Acceptance of a Novel Nutrition and Exercise Intervention to Manage Excess Gestational Weight Gain: Focus group study in Ontario,Canada
Author: 
Walji R, Wahoush O, Atkinson SA
Affiliations: 
Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, McMaster University
Citedate: 
Monday, December 31, 2012 - 19:00
Citation: 
Primary Health Care 3: 134. doi:10.4172/2167-1079.1000134

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